Tag Archives: Journalism

Interesting new blog: Vizualizing China at Chinfographics

I have a soft spot for really cool data visualizations and well-executed infographics. They are often wonderful ways to tell stories or help people truly grasp complex issues or statistics. That’s why I’ve long liked the very cool Information is … Continue reading

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Unsolicited advice for Xinhua’s new CNC TV news outfit

To listen to people moan about the fact that China has sixty “Confucius Centers” in the US to America’s zilch-nada in China you’d think the Chinese were wrapping up hearts and minds around the planet while America gets relegated to … Continue reading

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Great interview with one of the definitive modern China writers

I recently finished listening to a podcast of a long interview of writer Peter Hessler by Ken Pomeranz, China Beat contributor and UC Irvine history professor. It’s nearly an hour and a half long, and a few weeks old, but … Continue reading

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Better video of last month’s NewsMorphosis conference

You may recall that I made something of an ill-starred trip to Hawaii last month to speak on a panel at the ThinkTech Hawaii NewsMorphosis event. I had previously posted video of all the panels at the event. Jay Fidell, … Continue reading

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Video from the NewsMorphosis conference

Note: While this post explains the background of the conference and includes the original video, a better video of the panel was later posted here. The week before last Imagethief was in Hawaii to participate in the NewsMorphosis panel organized by … Continue reading

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Don’t scoop the reporter who interviews you, and other PR basics

Last Wednesday, the 21st, the IT news channel of giant Chinese portal Sohu published the transcript of an interview of Sohu CEO Charles Zhang by Hong Kong-based BusinessWeek journalist Bruce Einhorn. All well and good, you might think. Chinese portals … Continue reading

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Was the China corruption website collapse story “newsiness”?

The greatest contribution that comedian Stephen Colbert has made to modern society is the concept of “truthiness”. Reading from the Wikipedia definition, truthiness is: …a satirical term to describe things that a person claims to know intuitively or “from the … Continue reading

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What to make of Edwin Maher?

Imagethief found the LA Times article on CCTV9′s western anchorman, Edwin Maher, quite interesting. I didn’t have time to comment on it when it first appeared, but in general I found the story balanced as it presented both criticisms and … Continue reading

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Nobody said media-whoring would be easy

If you follow the Internet in China, you may have heard of a young man who goes by the online name “Zola” (or “Zuola” to be perfectly correct). He has been billed as “China’s first citizen journalist“. Zola first attracted … Continue reading

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I say “tomato”, you say “massacre”, let’s call the whole thing off

It is a truism of public relations and communication that he who controls the language with which an issue is defined controls the debate. If you can attach your terminology to a situation, you have leverage over public opinion. Don’t … Continue reading

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